Archives for posts with tag: printmaking

IntervalsWeb-1024x622Presented by South Main Gallery and Capture Photography Festival
Curated by Edward Peck and Phyllis Schwartz (Sassamatt Collective)
We are pleased to present exciting new and recent work by 7 international photographic artists, including 3 world premieres at South Main Gallery. The exhibition features Goga Bayat, David Ellingsen, Jim Friesen, Diana Nicholette Jeon, Edward Peck, Phyllis Schwartz and Andrew Ward.

March 31st to April 9th
Opening Reception: Thursday, March 31st /7 – 9 pm
Artist Talk: Saturday, April 2nd / 2 – 4 pm

Don’t miss a chance to talk to the artists about their work on Thursday at the Opening Reception or Saturday at the Artist Talk featuring Diana Nicolette Jeon and Andrew Ward.

Seven global photographers converge in an exhibition about the rhythms and tensions in the contemporary geographical, social and psychological landscapes.

Intervals: Photography in Flux is a collection of unique and unusual digital and photographic processes that are rarely seen in one setting. The methods and techniques range from those used long before the invention of the camera to the advanced technology available to artists today. The works are presented through diverse photographic methods using encaustic, cameraless exposures, and iPhonography. Their themes thread around the deconstruction of identity, environmental issues, disposable society, speaking under oppression and the mysteries in the mundane.

An Exhibition Catalogue will be available in the gallery and from Blurb

South Main Gallery
279 East 6th Avenue
Vancouver, BC V5T 1J7
The exhibition continues through Saturday, 09 April. South Main Gallery is open Tuesday – Thursday (10AM – 5:30 PM), Friday-Saturday (11AM-5:30PM) and Sunday by appointment; private viewing available (604.565.5622). An Artist Talk will be held on Saturday, 08 April (2-4 pm).

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Telling Stories — a visual art exhibition, my most recent Best B4 Collective project co-curated with Alison Keenan, presents the work of nine Vancouver artists telling stories in a variety of media. We have selected artists who both tell stories about contemporary issues and push the boundaries of their artistic medium. The exhibition opens 07 November at the On-Tak Gallery in the Chinese Cultural Centre and runs through 19 December.

Urban and environmental issues are the predominant themes running through the stories in this exhibition. Alison Keenan uses scale to tell visual stories about the territorial clash between avian and human creatures. Edward Peck’s photographs zoom into Berlin graffiti to re-tell the on-going stories found in the urban streetscape. My Salton Sea series pictures surreal environmental devastation caused by the food and computer industries situated on the US-Mexican border.

New to the Best B4 Collective are six artists who tell stories using fibre and installation art. Daphne Harwood uses the quilting medium to document urban transformation where once stood Imagination Market on the north shore of False Creek. Sophi Liang installs a ladder which holds traditional books to deconstruct traditional Chinese cultural values transplanted in a new cultural landscape. Colette Lisoway’s multi-screen prints build up a new image of a multicultural society in a rapidly changing community.

Uncanny stories are told in sculpture, painting and photography, stories that reframe the issues of environmental, urban and cultural conflict. Debra Sloan’s sculptures freeze tense, mischievous moments. June Yun’s paintings might look like misty Chinese countryside landscapes, but they are in fact stories of pollution that causes a nuclear winter. The tension in Jim Friesen’s stormy skies tell stories about the cycle of tension and release, a metaphor for many of the issues presented in the stories in this exhibition.

Each weekend, free community events will be offered to the public, and during the week, participating artists will be working with students in the community who visit the exhibition.  Further details are found on the Events Page of the Best B4 Collective Blog.

I am writing this blog so I can learn to spell and understand pareidolia. In the 70s, I read an article in Scientific American that explained how the eye-brain constructed recognizable shapes from ambiguity. That information gave me insight into how visual art that compelled caused me to look again, and I was sure I would remember that word. I reached for that word many times, talking around it and hoped someone could fill in the gap in my knowledge. That gap was filled in conversation following one of my Facebook posts during  the  Black and White Photo challenge this September. Now in a time when access to this kind of information is only a few keystrokes away, I am able to fill in that gap.

Pareiolia explains why we see the man in the moon, dragons in clouds, faces (especially eyes) in tree bark and projected imagery in reflective surfaces. This rediscovery of this word and this phenomenon gives both an explanation for my fascination with abstract Lumen Print compositions and a context for my artist process. Artwork, music and literature that offer multiple valid readings have always attracted me;  my favourites continue to invite another layer of meaning. My Lumen Prints that render smaller ambiguous pareidoltric artifacts engage my viewers and often spark interesting conversation. I look again.

Bladderwrack and Rainwater (2010)

Bladderwrack and Rainwater (2010)

One of my most enduring compositions, Mother and Child, was an early starting point in my Lumen Print artist practice. When I look at this Lumen Print, I see a goat like figure and a playful calf nuzzling up affectionately to a protective figure, a mother to my way of looking at it; I want to see a Mother and Child, and a reach into the photograph for more imagery to complete that story. Others might see darkened outlines of familiar seaweed shapes: bladderwrack, sea lettuce and the potassium deposits made by sheets of Lamenaria left out in the rain. My early Lumen Print work was essentially creative botanical documentation. I discovered the X-Ray like marks in Lumen Prints  yield more information than in botanical drawings; these Lumen Print documents simultaneously photograph the interior and exterior of the specimen. When I freed these materials from their orthodox portraiture and used these materials in the markmaking process,  then landscapes and narratives emerged. Instead of Lamenaria and Bladderwrack resting on photosensitive surfaces for a portrait, they were telling stories.

Sea Shells and Rainwater (lumen lith printed from a handmade negative, 2010)

Sea Shells and Rainwater (lumen lith printed from a handmade negative, 2010)

Wanting to go beyond the discoveries of the botanists who were among the first to discover a photographic process for recording visual information in their notations, I turned to an exploration of the capacity of sheet film in Lumen Printing.  A 4 x 5 inch block of sheet film does not leave much space for composition, a challenge when I was composing organic material on photo paper that measured 16 x 20 inches. I was curious to find out how much detail sheet film would record for printing and projecting in large format. Sea Shells and Rainwater was my first handmade negative; I positioned a small handful of crushed seashells on sheet film and exposed it to an afternoon of hazy light. This negative was digitized and developed much the way I worked in an analogue darkroom: amplifying light and tonal values. I worked on this image until it came to life: when a pair of eyes appear and a life form took shape on a green colour field. In digital format, I am able to show X-Ray layers in much the same way they appear in analogue Lumen Prints.

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Recent Lumen Prints, both analogue and digital, tell pareidolic stories: Caribou posing for a portrait, momento mori in What Remains from gathering foliage in New York, possible life forms Among Cherry Blossoms, a portrait emerging from Chesterman Beach sea tangles. And more at Sassamatt Images.

Art Rental Show — two of my recent Lumen Prints have been added to the Cityscapes Art Rental collection and will be on show in their salon syle exhibition. Thursday, 08 January, 7 – 9 PM (Cityscapes, 355 Lonsdale, North Vancouver).

Truth and Beauty DoorCrasher Special— offers Limited Edition Prints (Desert Salt, for example), OpenStock Prints and Loose Prints at discounted prices. One week only: 10 – 17 January (Noon – 5pm), 698 West 16th Avenue. Check out the Collective collection.

Winter Salon at Photohaus Gallery — WinterSalon continues thru January. Three of my Lumen Prints are on show in this exhibition. Two of these prints are analogue lumen prints; it is an exciting opportunity because (as far as I know) I am the only artist in Greater Vancouver working in this hybrid photo-printmaking medium. Check website for hours of opening and location.

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One of my sketchbooks is on the Sketchbook Project Summer Tour. The bookmobile will pull into Vancouver and park in front of Emily Carr University on Granville Island this coming Monday, 07 July (open from 1 – 5PM). Sketchbook Project tours are fun. In addition to checking out and reading artist made books, there are also drawing and postcard writing activities. If you can’t get to the Sketchbook Project in Vancouver, find your closest city, check out some sketchbooks and let me know what you think. http://www.sketchbookproject.com/sbp2014

Like some of my other  sketchbooks residing in the Brooklyn Art Library, Last Trip to Surrey reaches deep into family history. It reflects the ending of a long journey of a family elder in a series of drawings about many journeys to visit and attend family meetings. It is difficult to disguise the debilitating impact of these visits, but somehow, I found a playful way to bring colour to time of fading light. This book can be viewed on line along with other books in the touring collection. http://www.sketchbookproject.com/users/queenofmidnight/artwork

Papergirl Vancouver openings Tuesday, 08 July (from 6 – 9 pm), and the exhibition will be on view until 11 July at the Roundhouse Community Arts and Recreation Centre (181 Roundhouse Mews). The Papergirl Rideout is 19 July, starting at 11Am, and artwork will be distributed to unsuspecting recipients along a yet to be disclosed route. More about Papergirl http://www.papergirlvancouver.com  https://www.facebook.com/PapergirlVancouver

My involvement in Papergirl reflects my belief in the importance of generosity and keeping art in circulation. Often, I think about the monetary value of a work of art and the impossibility of putting a price on creativity. Papergirl makes it possible for me to live these values. There are, of course, situations where/when it is appropriate to exchange money for artwork, and yes, an art sale is sweet. It has been an honour to have been selected by Papergirl to offer Lumen Print Workshops as part of the promotion of this year’s Papergirl event. Some of the work produced in these workshops will be in the exhibition and then distributed.

 

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The Tree: Literal and Figurative, an exhibition curated by Alison Keenan and Phyllis Schwartz, expresses the theme of nature as experienced in forests, the built environment and as raw material for industry. The purpose of this exhibition is to show the tree as a common link in Canadian culture that provides a canopy, which spans all cultures, communities, collectives, artists, and individuals.This group exhibition presents images and impressions of the tree in a variety of media  will surely evoke myriad myths and memories about the tree. 

The artists from BestB4 Collective are graduates from Emily Carr University of Art + Design and the University of British Columbia.  The Tree is an inaugural BestB4 Collective exhibition by eight artists working in eight different media include the paintings of Alison Keenan, experimental photography by Phyllis Schwartz, drawings by Anna Ruth and Tony Chu Yin Tak, large-scale photography by Edward Peck, ceramics by Pauline Doyle, felt sculpture by Ellen Bang and installation work by Connie Sabo. The exhibition is on show at the Chinese Cultural Centre Museum in Vancouver between 11 January and 17 February 2014.  Exhibition Details. 

BestB4 Collective is a Vancouver-based collaborative artist collective established by Alison Keenan and Phyllis Schwartz. The focus of their collaboration is an ongoing inquiry into themes of the natural and built environments, the use of public space by the private individual, contemporary dance as an art form and as public performance.

The Tree exhibition includes my recent lumen prints. In the gallery is my series of analogue lumen prints made during a recent visit to New York . New York: What Remains? shows traces and shadows of early summer foliage mostly collected near the Natural History Museum and Central Park. In the showcase windows are my recent digital prints made from handmade negatives. Illuminations is a series of forest abstractions made from kelp forest debris washed ashore at Chesterman Beach and windfall gathered in my back yard after a series of winter and early spring storms.

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It’s art residency season. Working in classrooms adds another layer to my artist practice: ideas spark when I share my ideas, techniques and suggestions. Curious minds ask provocative questions. Busy hands show me how my own practice transforms in a shared creative process. Ideas go places I never would have imagined. Exhibition and celebration brings new ideas to move forward.There’s always much to show for these joyful moments in the classroom, and I long for studio time so I can go forward with new ideas and new work. 

Recently, I presented a  lumen prints workshop  at the ArtStarts Gallery  in celebration of BC Arts and Culture Week in conjunction with Botanimalogy—Expressions of Nature, an exhibition of lumen prints made during my residency at Kitsilano Secondary School. This exhibition of both analogue and digital lumen prints is on show through August at the ArtStarts Gallery at 808 Richards Street, open Tuesday through Saturday.

Check out my new work at two openings on Friday, 25 January. One of my New York street shots is in Bikes Inside, a group exhibition at Hot Art Wet City. Five of my abstracts are showing in Abstract Expressionism, a group exhibition at Photohaus Gallery.

Ninth Avenue Cyclist II is part of a series inspired by Diane Evans and Kristina Kreber; it is a photograph created across the street from B and H Photos in New York (Ninth Avenue and 34th Street). Current work showing in Abstract Expressionism is from a new series of work that continues my lumen printing experimentation; these hybrid prints made from handmade negatives on 4 x 5 sheet film that are digitized.

More exhibition and opening night details below.

Abstract Expressionism
Photohaus Gallery, 14 West 7th Avenue, Vancouver
January 25 – 14 February
Opening: 25 January, 7 – 10 pm
Gallery catalogue available
http://photohausgallery.com
Bikes Inside
Hot Art Wet City Pop Up Gallery, 752 East Broadway, Vancouver
25 January – 13 February
Opening: 25 January, 7 – 11 pm
http://hotartwetcity.com/bikes-inside/

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Follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/queenofmidnight  

Like Sassamatt Images on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SassamattImages

Learn more about Sassamatt Images http://about.me/phyllisSchwartz

And, if you are at the  Queen Elizabeth Theatre before 18 February 2013, check out In Camera: the working dancer, an exhibition of my photographs and Alison Keenan’s paintings, a body of work made in cooperation with Ballet BC. It is showing in the Mezzanine Gallery and my ceramic sculptures on the top floor. Let me know what you think.

Winter: a season to dream about what will take flight this spring. Keep warm.

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Follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/queenofmidnight  

Like Sassamatt Images on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SassamattImages

Learn more about Sassamatt Images http://about.me/phyllisSchwartz

And, if you are at the  Queen Elizabeth Theatre before 18 February 2013, check out my photographs showing in the Mezzanine Gallery and my sculptures on the top floor. Let me know what you think.

 

What Remains, a selection of Salton Sea lumen prints and digital photographs are on show in  In the Earth, in the Sky, which Wednesday evening and runs until 04 November.  More specifically, this exhibition shows the work of ten international artists dealing with the theme of death.

My work is a direct confrontation of death forces in the Salton Sea Region on the California-Mexican border where much of the North American produce is grown at great expense to the environment. While some efforts are in motion to reclaim areas of the Salton Sea and residents are expected to clean debris from the beaches, the salt sea continues to dehydrate causing the salinity level to rise which in turn challenges the Tilapia and other marine life to adapt or die. In the surrounding regions, residents have no choice but to purchase water that has been desalinated. My lumen prints record the traces and shadows of this dying seashore.

This exhibition is is presented by Äkkigalleria, a nomadic art gallery located in temporarily vacant storefronts in Jyväskylä, Finland. “Äkkigalleria was founded by visual artist Anna Ruth and graphic designer/photographer Juho Jäppinen, in 2009, out of the necessity to mobilize the visual arts in spur of the moment happenings. [They] strive to promote creative risk taking, to find new and imaginative ways of sharing art with the public and to bring art to different public spheres by recycling existing spaces.” https://www.facebook.com/pages/Äkkigalleria/144130014608?fref=ts

Salton Sea Beach Debris and Dessicated Tilapia (lumen print, 2011)

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