Archives for posts with tag: organic

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Primal Sympathies is a sketchbook that follows the falling Autumn Leaves that augur the cherry blossoms announcing the arrival of Spring. Black ants crawling through dried leaves encounter red ants crawling along branches hosting swollen buds about to burst into full bloom.

This progression of colour — parched red, orange and brown leaves that give life to pink blossoms that intensify as springtime unfolds  — is the landscape for ink drawings of determined ants crawling steadily through the cycle of the seasons. These interpretive botanical drawings are informed by William Wordsworth’s Ode: Intimations of Immortality.

Though nothing can bring back the hour
of splendour in the grass, or glory in the flower;

we will grieve not, rather find
strength in what remains behind,
in the primal sympathy
which having been must ever be.

Moving forward, Primal Sympathies has left the studio for an opening at the Brooklyn Art Library, a book tour through Toronto, Chicago, and Atlanta and a return to the Brooklyn Art Library collection. Much like a grown-up child leaving home, the Sketchbook Project asks that the work reside in a collection open to the public and be available for touring. The sketchbook, hence, comes to life in the hands of the reader, in the reading room, online and on tour.

Primal Sympathies can be viewed at the Brooklyn Art Library (28 Frost Street, Brooklyn). Watch for an announcement when the sketchbook is online. Check it out in Brooklyn (23 June), Toronto (27-29 June), Chicago (3-5 August) and Atlanta (21 – 23 September).

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Finn Slough Landscape

 

Gilbert, Arizona — 06 March – 21 April

LightSensitive 2018, an exhibition of traditional darkroom and alternative process photography, opens at Art Intersection on Saturday, 10 March (5 – 7pm). The selected works, according to juror scott b. davis, “…range from abstract images that defy our expectations of photography to others that affirm our belief in the medium’s inherent specificity.”

Two Lumen Prints from my Finn Slough Series will be on show in an exhibition of handcrafted prints by photographers working in the tradition of light sensitive creative processes. The organic nature of these prints made using materials gathered at Finn Slough reflect the quality of life in a tiny fishing community in Richmond, British Columbia, Canada where 30 residents live in wooden houses along a marshy riverbank. The indigenous and cultivated plant materials used to make the photograms reference a community that is inextricably connected to the environment and persistently adaptable to the encroaching built environment that challenges its existence.

These Lumen Print photograms are made by placing plant materials on black-and-white photo paper, which were exposed to both sunlight and the elements for 48 hours during a December snowstorm and then processed in fixer. The atmospheric conditions affecting these prints were especially unusual, resulting in distress to the light sensitive emulsion, which can be seen in the unique marks on the photosensitive surface.

Light Sensitive will show at Art Intersection, a gallery and workspace in Gilbert, Arizona, that promotes the intersection of photography with related art forms. The exhibition runs from 06 March thru 21 April (207 North Gilbert Road, Gilbert Arizona). Opening reception is Saturday, 10 March, 5 – 7 pm).

 

Two recent Lumen Prints have been selected for exhibition in Light Sensitive 2018, a signature exhibition of photography created using traditional darkroom and alternative photographic processes. Both of these prints were made using materials gathered at Finn Slough, a tiny fishing community in Richmond, British Columbia, Canada where approximately 30 residents live in wooden houses along a marshy riverbank. The indigenous and cultivated plant materials used to make the photograms reference a community that is inextricably connected to the environment and persistently adaptable to the encroaching built environment that challenges its existence.

These Lumen Print photograms are made by placing plant materials on black-and-white photo paper, which were exposed to both sunlight and the elements for 48 hours and then processed in fixer. The plant enzymes and atmospheric conditions interacted with the photo-emulsion to produce unexpected results on the surface of the paper, leaving X-ray like marks on both their shapes and interiors. The atmospheric conditions affecting these prints were especially unusual — work that was set out on a cold December night was visited by a slushy snowstorm that was followed by freezing weather that adhered the prints to the developing table for an additional day of soaking up diffused light. Carefully, these prints were thawed and released; the impact of this distress can be seen in the unique marks on the photosensitive surface.

Light Sensitive, juried by scott b. davis founder of the Medium Festival of Photography, will show at Art Intersection, a gallery and workspace in Gilbert, Arizona, that promotes the intersection of photography with related art forms. The exhibition runs from 06 Marth thru 21 April (207 North Gilbert Road, Gilbert Arizona). Open reception is Saturday, 10 March, 5 – 7 pm).

TRUTH AND BEAUTY Digital Gallery presents Illuminations, a selection of my recent lument prints. This exclusive, inaugural Online Exhibition aims to reach a broad international audience and enhance ongoing programming at the Vancouver gallery.

Illuminations, a series of Photograms, assembles impressions of materials placed on photosensitive paper using organic materials gathered from the beach, the forest, and the street. I record traces and shadows made by the various debris on sheet film. These handmade negatives are then digitized and transformed into an illumination of their original organic form.

Visit the DIGITAL GALLERY to enjoy this inaugural exhibition of Lumen Prints.

Turbulence
Pigment ink on cotton made from a handmade negative using a Lumen Print process

Art Rental Show — two of my recent Lumen Prints have been added to the Cityscapes Art Rental collection and will be on show in their salon syle exhibition. Thursday, 08 January, 7 – 9 PM (Cityscapes, 355 Lonsdale, North Vancouver).

Truth and Beauty DoorCrasher Special— offers Limited Edition Prints (Desert Salt, for example), OpenStock Prints and Loose Prints at discounted prices. One week only: 10 – 17 January (Noon – 5pm), 698 West 16th Avenue. Check out the Collective collection.

Winter Salon at Photohaus Gallery — WinterSalon continues thru January. Three of my Lumen Prints are on show in this exhibition. Two of these prints are analogue lumen prints; it is an exciting opportunity because (as far as I know) I am the only artist in Greater Vancouver working in this hybrid photo-printmaking medium. Check website for hours of opening and location.

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Winter Salon 2014 opens Thursday, 27th November ( 7 – 10:30 pm) at PhotoHaus Gallery (14 West 7th Avenue) with an exciting collection of work that includes three Lumen Prints that were recently exhibited at die Bedürfnisanstalt in Hamburg Germany in September.

MisSummer Spanish Bank Impressions is my current analogue Lumen Print Series. On a parched summer day, I gathered materials from what had been deposited on the beach at high tide. In my work, I am always curious to discover what emerges from the footprints and shadows of my compositions on photosensitive materials. This summer’s pareidolic gift offered images of caribou, bears and canine forms, including one that received Honourable Mention from the Cascadia exhibition jury.

My current series of Digital Lumen Prints, Illuminations and Impressions,  are made from materials gathered from the Ocean Shores (Washington) foreshore. These images are made from handmade negatives using a Lumen Printing process and then digitized. These new plant forms have made new forms that trace the footprint and capture the shadows on photosensitive materials. Their luminescence invite the viewer to imagine motion and drama in what remains.

This Autumn’s exhibition at die Bedürfnisanstalt featured a selection of New York analogue Lumen prints that were exhibited in Tree — literal and figurative (On-Tak Gallery, Vancouver Chinese Cultural Centre) and premiered MidSummer Spanish Banks Impressions. A selection of digital Lumen Prints were previously showcased at the Chinese Cultural Centre Museum as well as new works made at Ocean Shores, Washington.

Caribou Portrait, Ocean Shores Impressions 1, Serious Caribou

Caribou Portrait, Ocean Shores Impressions 1, Serious Caribou

Winter Salon 2014 continues through December. Check hours and address at PhotoHaus Gallery’s website. http://photohausgallery.com/upcoming/

Shelter Island             Illuminations 
Edward Peck        Phyllis Schwartz 

Die Bedürfnisanstalt, Bleickenallee 26a, Hamburg 22763

Vernissage: Sa: 13.09.2014 12-17 Uhr
Öffnungszeiten
So., 14.09.2014, 14 – 18 Uhr
Mo., 15.09.2014, 16 – 20 Uhr
Sa., 20.09.2014, 14 – 18 Uhr
So., 21.09.2014, 14 – 18 Uhr
Lumen Print Workshop/Vorführung [auf Englisch]
Di., 23.09.2014, 14 – 18 Uhr
Neue Fotoarbeiten
Mi., 24.09.2014, 18 – 23 Uhr
Do., 25.09.2014, 15 – 19 Uhr
Finissage: Fr., 26.09.2014, 16 – 20 Uhr

Sassamatt presents the European premier of new work by Phyllis Schwartz and Edward Peck. These Canadian experimental visual artists work in photographic medium. Schwartz is one of the few contemporary artists making artwork using the lumen print process. These hybrid prints are made by a contact and printing process photosensitive surfaces that are digitized. Peck with multi-disciplinary background is using a multiple exposure photographic hybrid digital development process to create abstract works from concrete objects.

Sassamatt, a Canadian based artist collective, presents work by Edward Peck and Phyllis Schwartz for exhibition in Bedürfnisanstalt between 13 and 26 September. These two photo-based artists use the details located in their immediate environment as inspiration for innovative image making. Their exhibition, Sassamatt Presents, is the European premier of their latest work. The exhibition will be held in Die Bedürfnisanstalt, a unique gallery exhibition space in Hamburg’s Altona community. They will also be open for visitors to watch their work in progress. There will also be a workshop demonstration of the lumen process and both artist will be available to discuss their work and artist processes.

Edward Peck is an experimental digital photographer with multi-disciplinary background that includes painting, watercolour and printmaking. Much of his current source material is drawn from weathered and sea battered boats, some of which are in the process of returning to their elemental state, bringing the aging process of these boats to life by through an abstract exploration of form, colour and texture. His bold compositions are colour fields confidently sectored by elementary materials that are caught in the act of transformation. These transformations become abstract landscapes.

Phyllis Schwartz is an experimental photographer. Her x-ray like images penetrate the surface of her subject material and produce secondary images discovered only in the development stage of her printmaking. Plant enzymes and atmospheric conditions also interact with the surface to produce unexpected results on the surface of the paper or sheet film, leaving x-ray like marks of both their shapes and interiors. These illuminations of New York foliage and British Columbia  marine plant life hover on the cusp of abstract imagery and poetry.

Addition information on these two artists can be found on the Sassamatt Images website www.sassamatt.com .

One of my sketchbooks is on the Sketchbook Project Summer Tour. The bookmobile will pull into Vancouver and park in front of Emily Carr University on Granville Island this coming Monday, 07 July (open from 1 – 5PM). Sketchbook Project tours are fun. In addition to checking out and reading artist made books, there are also drawing and postcard writing activities. If you can’t get to the Sketchbook Project in Vancouver, find your closest city, check out some sketchbooks and let me know what you think. http://www.sketchbookproject.com/sbp2014

Like some of my other  sketchbooks residing in the Brooklyn Art Library, Last Trip to Surrey reaches deep into family history. It reflects the ending of a long journey of a family elder in a series of drawings about many journeys to visit and attend family meetings. It is difficult to disguise the debilitating impact of these visits, but somehow, I found a playful way to bring colour to time of fading light. This book can be viewed on line along with other books in the touring collection. http://www.sketchbookproject.com/users/queenofmidnight/artwork

Papergirl Vancouver openings Tuesday, 08 July (from 6 – 9 pm), and the exhibition will be on view until 11 July at the Roundhouse Community Arts and Recreation Centre (181 Roundhouse Mews). The Papergirl Rideout is 19 July, starting at 11Am, and artwork will be distributed to unsuspecting recipients along a yet to be disclosed route. More about Papergirl http://www.papergirlvancouver.com  https://www.facebook.com/PapergirlVancouver

My involvement in Papergirl reflects my belief in the importance of generosity and keeping art in circulation. Often, I think about the monetary value of a work of art and the impossibility of putting a price on creativity. Papergirl makes it possible for me to live these values. There are, of course, situations where/when it is appropriate to exchange money for artwork, and yes, an art sale is sweet. It has been an honour to have been selected by Papergirl to offer Lumen Print Workshops as part of the promotion of this year’s Papergirl event. Some of the work produced in these workshops will be in the exhibition and then distributed.

 

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Art residency season is quickly drawing to a close My artist practice is recursive. I continually spiral back to my starting points to re-think what I thought I knew, what I thought I mastered, what needs re-invention. A foundation class is an advancement class as it reinforms me about processes, practices and possibilities. My best way for me to go forward is to go back to the where it all began. 

Working  in classrooms sends me back to the beginning and  continues to add another layer to my artist practice: ideas spark when I share my ideas, techniques and suggestions. Curious minds ask provocative questions. Busy hands show me how my own practice transforms in a shared creative process. Ideas go places I never would have imagined. Exhibition and celebration brings new ideas to move forward.There’s always much to show for these joyful moments in the classroom, and I long for studio time so I can go forward with new ideas and new work.

Recently, I completed an ArtStarts residency in two ceramics classes at Kitsilano Secondary School working with Sandra Grosch. Fascinated by the alchemy of ceramics, Sandra and I designed a residency that offered students the opportunity to explore the possibilities of working with native clay, local clay excavated not far from the location of their school. In the past, I have come home from various locations with a handful of clay that I formulated into both functional and decorative object, and often I offer them to the owners of the land from which the clay was excavated — produce from a garden a few feet deeper. Working with native clay is a trial and error process, and I shared with students information about the history of pottery in British Columbia. Coastal British Columbia has a contemporary ceramics community but lacks an indigenous one. The clay that is found along the coast and up the Fraser Valley is soft and fires into a brittle form; hence, this clay requires refractory materials to be added in order to make the clay both workable and functional.

Students confronted the challenge of working with native clay by experimenting with the limits and possibilities of a material new to them and discovered ceramic forms that would keep their shape. They discovered that a traditional pinch pot had to be much thicker in order to retain its shape and that cylinder ware had to be much wetter to prevent cracking along stress lines. They were surprised that coil work was almost impossible. Once they were able to work with clay that had been formulated with materials that made the clay more plastic, they were back in their comfort zone and could apply some of their handbuilding techniques to make forms that would hold their shape. Their discoveries reflect a sense of wonder about their own community resources and curiosity about what else lies beneath the surface of the land in their locale

Currently, student samples of their first native clay exploration can be viewed at the ArtStarts Gallery  in conjunction with Timescapes — Local Connections and Natural Indicators of Time. This installation of figurative clay work made during my residency at Kitsilano Secondary School is on show through August at the ArtStarts Gallery at 808 Richards Street, open Tuesday through Saturday.

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TimeRaiser Vancouver (2014) selected Storm, one of my digital prints, for this year’s auction. TimeRaiser is an organization that promotes volunteer work by purchasing art from local artists and then offering it for auction at an event where emerging professions bid their time in exchange for artwork. While volunteer work is being completed, artwork is displayed in TimeRaiser’s office. This year TimeRaiser auctions are being simultaneously held in Vancouver, Calgary, Montreal, Regina, St. John’s and Winnipeg on Thursday, 08 April. Tickets for Vancouver’s TimeRaiser being held at Simon Fraser University (Segal  Building).

Storm

Storm

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